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LAVC

Frequently Asked Questions

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  1. What services does the Writing Center offer?

Free one-on-one tutoring, handouts, laboratory reading & writing courses, Mac Computer lab, printing service, reference library, and free workshops.

  1. What should students bring to the Writing Center?

Students should bring their student I.D. card and everything related to the assignment, including the syllabus, the assignment and any related notes and drafts, relevant texts, as well as any drafts the professor has commented on.

  1. Will the professor be notified when a student attends the writing center?

All visits to the Writing Center are confidential. However, students can show a yellow Conference Receipt to the professor as a proof that they have been to the Writing Center.

  1. How much does it cost?

The service is FREE.

  1. How can students make an appointment for a tutorial?

Call (818) 947-2810 or drop by LARC 229 to see if a tutoring session is available. Please see the appointment policies for further details.

If appointments are not available, students can have a walk-in session for 20 minutes. Please see the walk-In policies for further details.

  1. What happens in a tutoring session?

A typical session lasts for 30 minutes. A student can set the focus of the session, such as working on sentence structure. The student and the consultant can also discuss the assignment and work together to improve and develop their writing skills. Since our goal is to help students grow as writers rather than just to improve a specific paper, the consultant does not edit or proofread the paper but does show the student how to edit and proofread the assignment. We are here to make better writers.

  1. Is tutoring limited to students taking writing, literature, or English courses?

Consultants are trained to work on all types of writing. This means you can bring any writing assignment to get help on, as long as your writing is related to a class or academia. We DO NOT help students with creative writings, resumes, or cover letters unless these assignments are tied to a specific course.

  1. Who are the consultants?

All the consultants at the Writing Center are current students, undergraduate and graduate students. They have all demonstrated academic success as both writers and students.

  1. Do I need to print my paper?

The student and the consultant can look at the paper on one of the computers at the Writing center; students may also bring their personal laptops to view their documents.

  1. Do consultants edit, proofread papers, or “fix” papers?

No, the Writing Center is an educational service. Our consultants DON'T “fix” papers because a tutorial session is designed to provide additional skills or insights about the writing process. Thus, a tutorial session is designed to provide students with additional skills or insights about the writing process. However, our consultants do teach various strategies to edit and proofread papers.

However, the consultants do teach various strategies to edit and proofread papers.

  1. What types of writing do the consultants work with?

The consultants work with any type of writing for any class as long as the student is enrolled in the class at LAVC for the current semester. Additionally, we will help with personal statement for scholarship and university applications.

  1. Is the Writing Center only for first-year students?

The Writing Center is for all writers who are currently enrolled in LAVC. No matter what the skill level you have, people can always become better writers, and the writing center is the place to start.

  1. Is the Writing Center only for students who have problems with writing?

The Writing Center serves writers of all stages. Many of our tutorial sessions involve students who want to improve their papers or who are looking for someone to discuss various writing strategies. We can also help students with time management and study skills.

  1. Does the Writing Center work with non-native speaking students?

Our consultants are trained to work with students who are using English as a second language, or who are English Language Learners.